St. Mary of the Woods

35755 Detroit Rd Avon OH 44011

866-465-5993

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Summary of St. Mary of the Woods located in Avon, Ohio

At St. Mary of the Woods, we have a multitude of community features. Frequent off-site adventures and day trips are very popular with our residents. Pets such as dogs and cats are permitted in private rooms. Free wi-fi and high speed internet is offered to all our residents. Our location conveniently offers resident parking and guest parking. Now offering free move-in.

Dining Options

All meals are provided to occupants. We love to entertain visiting guests, meals included. Dining includes restaurant-style dining, private dining rooms for residents who wish to celebrate special occasions or entertain visitors, and room service. Our residents can enjoy meals prepared by a professional chef. We offer specified dining services such as vegetarian food and low/no sodium options.

On-Site Activities

We have specially curated on-site activities that stimulate both mental and physical health. To ensure residents enjoy a diverse cycle of events and amusement, we employ a full-time activities director. The exercise program includes chair yoga, a type of yoga that is modified to a seated position for those with physical limitations. We love to celebrate with holiday parties, birthday parties and BBQ's, picnics, and outdoor parties. Our community offers a healthy living program ensuring cognitive, dietary, and physical health to ensure residents live their best and healthiest lives. We offer Dakim BrainFitness(add TM), a clinically-proven brain-training program to help their residents improve and preserve mental functioning. We provide regular musical entertainment for the use of our residents - and in some instances, to take a trip down memory lane. Residents enjoy regular trips and outings to local neighborhoods and towns. Our communal space has a piano centerpiece for musically inclined residents and scheduled performances. Our inter-generational programs offer many benefits for both children and seniors, emphasizing the joys of human connectivity and propagating longer and happier lives for our residents.Residents may partake in recreational activities such as instructive community cooking classes. Our community activities cycle includes trivia nights, regular educational lectures covering a wide range of academic topics, and dances and "Senior Proms". Happy hour has a positive impact on the community; residents enjoy lively camaraderie.

Outdoor Common Areas

Outdoor common areas are designed with accessibility, flow, and movement in mind. Our community grounds is comprised of an outside patio garden accessible to all residents.

Indoor Common Areas

Indoor common areas are a nice, quiet place to enjoy the company of fellow residents or just to relax. Residents have access to our communal spaces including our community library, complete with a diverse selection of titles, a TV lounge, perfect for catching the latest episode of your favorite show or enjoying sports programming with other residents, and a bistro. At our community we have our own bar where residents gather, socialize, and enjoy tasty libations.

Community Amenities at St. Mary of the Woods

Living Options and Amenities

We offer 1 and 2-bedroom units for potential residents seeking a roommate, 1-bedroom units, 2-bedroom units, for potential residents seeking a roommate, studio units, and handicapped units designed for easy accessibility and for use by wheelchair users. Northern, Eastern, Southern, and Western-facing and ground floor quarters are available. Free wi-fi is provided to all of our residents. To accommodate our residents, our community has air conditioning, and temperatures are regulated to optimize comfort and safety. Some apartments are equipped with kitchenettes so that residents can make their own food. Resident units featuring roll-in showers are available. Units featuring full bathtubs are available.

Available Services at St. Mary of the Woods

Transportation

We provide complimentary transportation services at our community. We provide residents access to transportation services at a reasonable cost.

Personal Services

In our lobby, a dedicated concierge is available to attend to the basic and immediate needs of you and your visitors. We have a beautician conveniently located on-site - residents can easily receive beauty treatments for all occasions. Personal housekeeping services are provided as needed. Our on-site beauty salon provides hair care and beauty treatments, and our on-site barbershop can take care of all your grooming needs.

Religious Services

We offer on-site devotional services, so residents can practice or worship in the privacy of our community. Catholic and Protestant religious services are available, provided by a visiting chaplain. Offsite devotional services are offered in the nearby area. There are also several churches located within the surrounding neighborhood.

Medical Care Services

Our staff is awake and available 24 hours a day to assist your loved one with any time-sensitive needs that may arise. All services are provided by licensed practitioners present on staff 24/7. There are licensed nurses on-site to administer injections when needed. Available services include on-site RN's and LPN's. We have registered nurses on our community staff. We have a registered dietician / nutritionist on site. We have a Medical Director on staff who is responsible for putting together healthcare programs for residents, including medication management. We have a Nurse Practitioner on staff who serves as a Medical Director, responsible for putting together healthcare programs for residents, including medication management. The facility offers 2-person assisted transfers, including sitting-to-standing, standing-to-sitting, etc. We are not licensed by the state to offer medication dispensing services, however, residents are supported in their self-medication efforts as much as possible. Our lobby has a dedicated concierge available to attend to the basic and immediate needs of you and your visitors. We recruit first-class visiting podiatrists whose job it is to ensure our residents are happy, fit, and mobile. Regular visits from specialized occupational therapists are available to residents to aid development, recovery, improvements, and maintenance of skills needed for daily living. Speech therapy services are provided by trained and certified speech-pathologists. A visiting nurse is available to all residents. We always have a doctor on call to handle adjustments in medication, continued consultation, and urgent medical needs when they arise. A dentist pays regular visits to our facility. A visiting optometrist is available to provide comprehensive eye care. We offer skilled nursing care by licensed nurses, fully equipped to handle responsibilities such as wound care, tube feedings, and monitoring. Our residents may schedule reminders for medication and care activities. On-site hospice care is provided. This community provides ADL assistance, insulin injections, and licensed nurses are onsite to administer injections when needed. Services include incontinence care for bladder-related and bowel-related symptoms.

What to expect at St. Mary of the Woods

Community Certifications

Our property is licensed for 206 residents. The building was built in 2005, and most recently renovated in 2015. Our community is home to residents age 55 and above.

Local Emergency Services

Local fire, police, and EMT services are nearby and ready to respond.

Local Area Amenities

There are shopping centers and beautiful parks located in the surrounding neighborhood. Hotels are conveniently located near the facility for residents' guests and visitors. Our community is located near a college, and interaction with students who reside in the neighborhood is frequent.

Pricing at St. Mary of the Woods

Room Type
Monthly Range* (USD)

Studio
$ See Pricing
1 Bedroom
$ See Pricing
2 Bedrooms
$ See Pricing
Private
$ See Pricing

*Prices quoted are monthly rental charges and are provided by the communities themselves. Actual prices may differ due to one-time fees, timing and care services required. Speak with your Senior Living Advisor to learn more.

Reviews of St. Mary of the Woods

3 of 5 Average rating
6 Reviews
Reviews gathered from across the web
(2) A Place For Mom
(4) SeniorAdvisor.com
  • In Praise of Assisted Living

    I never wanted to live in an institution, to live with strangers. I wanted to keep my independence and my privacy. I wanted to spend the rest of my life in our own home with my wife, [name removed]. We had never owned a house before I retired. I was a minister, and we lived in houses the churches provided. [name removed] never complained about that, but when we finally were able to buy a house, she was overjoyed. “This is my house,” she would say. “I love my house.” It was a modest but pleasant house, with a patio where I could sit and read and watch the hummingbirds. And it was in an ideal location. We could walk to Lake Erie, sit on a bench, hold hands, and watch the sailboats go by. We were only a few blocks from the library and our favorite ice cream parlor. We were happy. But then life changed. [name removed] fell while walking to the bank and had to be helped home. She had a partial shoulder replacement, and brain surgery for water on the brain, and surgery and radiation for breast cancer, and then dementia. And our world fell apart. Finally, she died, at home, in my arms, after sixty-one years of marriage. What to do now? I was grieving and not well, and I didn’t want my family to have to care for me as they had for [name removed]. I thought about assisted living, but it seemed too expensive. That is, until my children convinced me that because I would no longer be paying for home health care or a mortgage or insurance or maintenance on the house or the upkeep of a car or for utilities or groceries or lawn care, it should be possible. And then, as a bonus, there would be no more cooking or cleaning or taking out the trash. And I would have my own apartment, with my own familiar furniture, and my music, and my books. So we visited several assisted living facilities, none of which appealed to me. One was affordable, but it was geared to young people and had little privacy. Another was large and impersonal. Still another was too close to a commercial area and a noisy construction site. But finally we found one that felt right, a quiet place called St. Mary of the Woods in Avon, Ohio. A friendly man who greeted us at St. Mary had a name tag that said simply “[name removed].” He turned out to be the administrator. The people who showed us around were kind and helpful. The apartments were comfortable, and the menus looked good. The Bingo and card games they offered didn’t interest me, but the musical performances, visits to the Cleveland Orchestra and the Ohio Light Opera, worship services, and opportunities for exercise did. So I took the plunge and signed up. And the house that [name removed] loved, with all its memories, was sold. St. Mary is a beautiful building, painstakingly maintained. But far more important are the kind and caring people I found here. I once told [name removed] I would live in a barn if I had these same people with me. From day one all the members of the staff knew my name. So I determined to learn their names and the names of the residents, and I made a list so I wouldn’t forget. And with the names, I met some fascinating people, both residents and staff. One resident, a former sailor, was easily recognized by the three American flags on his wheelchair. Another resident had two pinwheels on hers. A tablemate, just turned ninety-six, teases me about my falling asleep and failing to meet him to go to a worship service. I told him that when I fell asleep on the couch the book I had been reading fell on my toe and woke me up, and every so often, he says, with a twinkle in his eye, “I hope you didn’t hurt your toe.” Another tablemate told me about his high school teammate, Cliff Lewis, who became the first starting quarterback for the Cleveland Browns. One woman told me how she grew up on a farm, milking cows, went to college to study chemistry, and worked as a chemist all her life. Another woman, in her nineties, walks every day, has a pedometer, and tells me how many miles she has gone. A woman at her table just turned 102. There is a fascinating variety of backgrounds here that I didn’t have at home. A man tells me his parents came from Poland, and I ask him whether he speaks Polish. He answers me in Polish. A new woman grew up in the same neighborhood he did, and the staff sings “Happy Birthday” to her in Polish. A woman from the Province of Quebec proudly speaks French. A man who grew up speaking Italian teaches me a few phrases, and we usually greet each other in Italian, as I greet a woman from Austria in the German I learned in school. In addition to the residents, I also meet some of their families, like the former helicopter pilot who has his own plane and flies in from Alabama to see his mother. And his seven siblings who visit her faithfully. I would never have met any of these interesting people, if I were still at home, sitting on the couch all day, looking out the window, and lamenting times past. Many of the people who work here have become friends. The server who brought her fiancé in to introduce him to us. Her sister, who plays the viola in her high school orchestra. We talk about music and her college plans. Another server who jokingly reminds me to “eat your vegetables,” and one who loves theater and, before he went to graduate school, would break out with show tunes while he worked. The two grandmothers who take out their cellphones and show me pictures of their grandchildren. A nurse is on duty each day. I see one kind nurse kneeling down beside a frail resident, and hugging a grieving one, bringing healing not only with medicine but also by gently touching people who may no longer have anyone who touches them. Then there is the housekeeper who greets me every morning with the biggest, most welcoming smile. Another housekeeper, who when she learned my name is [name removed], turned off her sweeper, sat down beside me, and sang an old song to me: “Don’t Mess with [name removed].” She still sings snatches of it when we pass in the hall. The aides are friendly and helpful, and I appreciate the way they respond immediately to my call button, yet they sometimes seem intrusive. One unlocks my door and comes into my room in the middle of the night, which I think is invading my privacy. But she explains that she wants to be sure I am in my bed and not on the floor, and I remember the times I fell at night at home and wasn’t able to get up or to reach the phone to call for help. And I change my tune and thank her for checking on me. Other aides help me get into the shower, which I never thought I could tolerate. But as they do so they talk to me about their families or their pets or their second jobs, and soon it is friends who are helping me, not strangers. I love the people here. St. Mary has come to have the feel of a large family, with family members I look forward to seeing every day. If I had my “druthers,” as people say, I would still be at home with [name removed] beside me. But since that isn’t possible, I am perfectly content to be where I am. I thank God every day for my new home. [name removed] is a retired United Church of Christ minister. In addition to serving churches in Pennsylvania and Ohio, he worked for the Peace Corps in Ethiopia and Swaziland. He is the author of several books, the most recent being Major McKinley: [name removed] and the Civil War and Thinking Through the Children’s Sermon.

    Review originally written on A Place For Mom

    In Praise of Assisted Living

    I never wanted to live in an institution, to live with strangers. I wanted to keep my independence and my privacy. I wanted to spend the rest of my life in our own home with my wife, [name removed]. We had never owned a house before I retired. I was a minister, and we lived in houses the churches provided. [name removed] never complained about that, but when we finally were able to buy a house, she was overjoyed. “This is my house,” she would say. “I love my house.” It was a modest but pleasant house, with a patio where I could sit and read and watch the hummingbirds. And it was in an ideal location. We could walk to Lake Erie, sit on a bench, hold hands, and watch the sailboats go by. We were only a few blocks from the library and our favorite ice cream parlor. We were happy. But then life changed. [name removed] fell while walking to the bank and had to be helped home. She had a partial shoulder replacement, and brain surgery for water on the brain, and surgery and radiation for breast cancer, and then dementia. And our world fell apart. Finally, she died, at home, in my arms, after sixty-one years of marriage. What to do now? I was grieving and not well, and I didn’t want my family to have to care for me as they had for [name removed]. I thought about assisted living, but it seemed too expensive. That is, until my children convinced me that because I would no longer be paying for home health care or a mortgage or insurance or maintenance on the house or the upkeep of a car or for utilities or groceries or lawn care, it should be possible. And then, as a bonus, there would be no more cooking or cleaning or taking out the trash. And I would have my own apartment, with my own familiar furniture, and my music, and my books. So we visited several assisted living facilities, none of which appealed to me. One was affordable, but it was geared to young people and had little privacy. Another was large and impersonal. Still another was too close to a commercial area and a noisy construction site. But finally we found one that felt right, a quiet place called St. Mary of the Woods in Avon, Ohio. A friendly man who greeted us at St. Mary had a name tag that said simply “[name removed].” He turned out to be the administrator. The people who showed us around were kind and helpful. The apartments were comfortable, and the menus looked good. The Bingo and card games they offered didn’t interest me, but the musical performances, visits to the Cleveland Orchestra and the Ohio Light Opera, worship services, and opportunities for exercise did. So I took the plunge and signed up. And the house that [name removed] loved, with all its memories, was sold. St. Mary is a beautiful building, painstakingly maintained. But far more important are the kind and caring people I found here. I once told [name removed] I would live in a barn if I had these same people with me. From day one all the members of the staff knew my name. So I determined to learn their names and the names of the residents, and I made a list so I wouldn’t forget. And with the names, I met some fascinating people, both residents and staff. One resident, a former sailor, was easily recognized by the three American flags on his wheelchair. Another resident had two pinwheels on hers. A tablemate, just turned ninety-six, teases me about my falling asleep and failing to meet him to go to a worship service. I told him that when I fell asleep on the couch the book I had been reading fell on my toe and woke me up, and every so often, he says, with a twinkle in his eye, “I hope you didn’t hurt your toe.” Another tablemate told me about his high school teammate, Cliff Lewis, who became the first starting quarterback for the Cleveland Browns. One woman told me how she grew up on a farm, milking cows, went to college to study chemistry, and worked as a chemist all her life. Another woman, in her nineties, walks every day, has a pedometer, and tells me how many miles she has gone. A woman at her table just turned 102. There is a fascinating variety of backgrounds here that I didn’t have at home. A man tells me his parents came from Poland, and I ask him whether he speaks Polish. He answers me in Polish. A new woman grew up in the same neighborhood he did, and the staff sings “Happy Birthday” to her in Polish. A woman from the Province of Quebec proudly speaks French. A man who grew up speaking Italian teaches me a few phrases, and we usually greet each other in Italian, as I greet a woman from Austria in the German I learned in school. In addition to the residents, I also meet some of their families, like the former helicopter pilot who has his own plane and flies in from Alabama to see his mother. And his seven siblings who visit her faithfully. I would never have met any of these interesting people, if I were still at home, sitting on the couch all day, looking out the window, and lamenting times past. Many of the people who work here have become friends. The server who brought her fiancé in to introduce him to us. Her sister, who plays the viola in her high school orchestra. We talk about music and her college plans. Another server who jokingly reminds me to “eat your vegetables,” and one who loves theater and, before he went to graduate school, would break out with show tunes while he worked. The two grandmothers who take out their cellphones and show me pictures of their grandchildren. A nurse is on duty each day. I see one kind nurse kneeling down beside a frail resident, and hugging a grieving one, bringing healing not only with medicine but also by gently touching people who may no longer have anyone who touches them. Then there is the housekeeper who greets me every morning with the biggest, most welcoming smile. Another housekeeper, who when she learned my name is [name removed], turned off her sweeper, sat down beside me, and sang an old song to me: “Don’t Mess with [name removed].” She still sings snatches of it when we pass in the hall. The aides are friendly and helpful, and I appreciate the way they respond immediately to my call button, yet they sometimes seem intrusive. One unlocks my door and comes into my room in the middle of the night, which I think is invading my privacy. But she explains that she wants to be sure I am in my bed and not on the floor, and I remember the times I fell at night at home and wasn’t able to get up or to reach the phone to call for help. And I change my tune and thank her for checking on me. Other aides help me get into the shower, which I never thought I could tolerate. But as they do so they talk to me about their families or their pets or their second jobs, and soon it is friends who are helping me, not strangers. I love the people here. St. Mary has come to have the feel of a large family, with family members I look forward to seeing every day. If I had my “druthers,” as people say, I would still be at home with [name removed] beside me. But since that isn’t possible, I am perfectly content to be where I am. I thank God every day for my new home. [name removed] is a retired United Church of Christ minister. In addition to serving churches in Pennsylvania and Ohio, he worked for the Peace Corps in Ethiopia and Swaziland. He is the author of several books, the most recent being Major McKinley: [name removed] and the Civil War and Thinking Through the Children’s Sermon.

  • A place to watch

    My parents were in this facility for 2 1/2 yrs. it’s ok if they can totally take care of themselves, but beware if you are in need of a little help. Seems to be a lot of turnover of staff so many are not familiar with needs and characteristics of the residents. Check in on your loved ones often.

    Review originally written on A Place For Mom

    A place to watch

    My parents were in this facility for 2 1/2 yrs. it’s ok if they can totally take care of themselves, but beware if you are in need of a little help. Seems to be a lot of turnover of staff so many are not familiar with needs and characteristics of the residents. Check in on your loved ones often.

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Community Details at St. Mary of the Woods

    There are no reviews written for this community

    • St. Mary of the Woods Amenities

      • Vegetarian
      • Activities Onsite
      • Outdoor Common Areas
      • Activities Offsite
      • Meals Provided
      • Devotional Services Offsite
      • Beautician Onsite
      • Indoor Common Areas
      • Devotional Services Onsite

    Senior Housing Types Provided at St. Mary of the Woods

      There are no reviews written for this community

      • Assisted Living
      • Independent Living
      • Memory Care
      • Nursing Home
      • Care Homes
      • Home Care
      • Senior Apartments